Speed is everything in the hiring game

Not a day goes by when I’m not asked why it’s so hard to hire talented technologists.

My answer? It isn’t really, not if you change the way you hire.

The biggest impediment to hiring is not the lack of talent or the market, but the speed at which the employers move. Hirers who move within hours or days to respond, interview, and make offers are almost always successful and also enhance their reputation in the market as candidates spread the word about their experiences. This quick process is even more successful when you add clarity to it, and tell candidates what you’ll be doing and when so expectations are set.

But many employers say, “We’re ‘so and so’ bank or hedge fund or well publicized startup , we have a reputation and a well established process, that should trump everything.”

It doesn’t, nor does pay or benefits.

I usually know what’s going to happen when I hear a candidate say, ‘I still haven’t heard back, they’re probably not interested’. This leads a candidate to self doubt, and they perceive there’s no mutual interest. Then they manage their expectations down to the ‘not interested anyway’ level. They become quickly open to anyone else who moves fast on a hiring decision, despite whether it was a ‘better’ job or not.

Conversely, the palpable excitement I sense when candidates say ‘They reached out today and want to interview me tomorrow, I’m so excited’ or ‘I had all my interviews in one day they made an offer the next, incredible!’ makes me almost (or completely) certain there’s going to be a hire, and one that’s great for both sides. The candidate remains engaged and positive, and the hirers come out with a great new employee in less time.

 

And, from a hiring perspective, why wait? If you see a resume you like, move on it before someone else does, even if it means just running a phone screen on them. Even in large companies where jobs are required to be posted for a certain period of time, there are usually no restrictions on when you can start interviewing qualified candidates. What if you lost the perfect candidate who applied on day one because you waited until the posting closed on day fifteen (or, worse yet, 30!).

Underneath it all, the messages to the candidate are these:

  • This firm takes talent, hiring, and people seriously (or not)
  • This firm is clearly growing (I think?)
  • This firm prioritizes people over other things (sometimes)
  • I am going to enjoy working there because they are decisive and care (but maybe they don’t?)
  • They don’t leave people hanging (yes they do)

Moving quickly in no way derides the quality of the decision-making. Interviewers know by end of an interview which way they’d go, so waiting a week doesn’t improve or add to the process.

So if you want talent, you know what to do! Move fast!

Geoff is co-founder of untapt, and was CIO Capital Markets at Deutche Bank and CIO Fixed Income IT at Merrill Lynch in his previous life. At work, he rescues job candidates looking for an exciting career in FinTech. Outside of work, he's an avid kite boarder, marathon runner, and enjoys hiking across the Grand Canyon, bungee jumping in New Zealand and slaying dragons (for his kids). He may possibly be the most interesting man in FinTech.

Geoff is co-founder of untapt, and was CIO Capital Markets at Deutche Bank and CIO Fixed Income IT at Merrill Lynch in his previous life. At work, he rescues job candidates looking for an exciting career in FinTech. Outside of work, he's an avid kite boarder, marathon runner, and enjoys hiking across the Grand Canyon, bungee jumping in New Zealand and slaying dragons (for his kids). He may possibly be the most interesting man in FinTech.